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Thread: Upgrading your VPS's OS

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark100net
    CS courses spend whole lectures talking about what is and is not part of the OS. And of course it always ends up, "it depends".
    Hmm... I don't recall those lectures. Though I believe I had an understanding of what an OS consists of before college, so I probably ignored the professor during that particular diatribe.

    Quote Originally Posted by mark100net
    Absent any response I personally will feel free to upgrade anything that I installed myself.
    I think Pierre's point is this... if you screw something up by "upgrading" your VPS, don't expect them to fix it. So, as always when upgrading anything, especially things like gcc, bin-utils, glibc, etc., a backup of your important files would be a good idea. Just in case.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tikus
    If GCC isn't installed by default
    There is no "if" about it. GCC isn't installed by default.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tikus
    then how are you compiling anything? lol
    I'm not. Not until I install GCC and dependencies.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark100net
    There is no "if" about it. GCC isn't installed by default. I'm not. Not until I install GCC and dependencies.
    Caveat! Depends on your distro. Yes, it too is one of those "depends" questions.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonaward
    Caveat! Depends on your distro. Yes, it too is one of those "depends" questions.
    Aye indeed
    Though, as Gentoo does (my OS), I consider it part of the 'system' as most system packages are built with it, as are most packages you need to compile.
    Granted some programs aren't compiled with GCC at all or you don't need to compile anything to use the system immediately, thus the 'if' for some distros.

    However, I've never used a distro that hasn't required the use of GCC at some point or another, thus my consideration that it's at the 'system' level and not an option.
    Last edited by Tikus; 12-24-2006 at 12:07 AM.

  5. #15
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    Yeah, I'm a Gentoo-er here as well, so in that case, a compiler is high on the priority list and could probably be considered "part of" the os.

  6. #16
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    Jan 2007
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    Default Modify the template to change e.g. YUM and Apt?

    One nice thing would be if the template for the provided images included tweaked versions of the popular package management tools' config files, e.g
    YUM:
    /etc/yum.conf
    [main]
    cachedir=/var/cache/yum
    keepcache=0
    debuglevel=2
    logfile=/var/log/yum.log
    pkgpolicy=newest
    distroverpkg=redhat-release
    tolerant=1
    exactarch=1
    obsoletes=1
    gpgcheck=1
    plugins=1
    metadata_expire=1800
    exclude=udev kernel mkinitrd module-init-tools

    APT:
    /etc/apt/preferences
    Package: vzdev
    Pin: <whatever the version is>

    Yes, ultimately it's up to us as the admins not to balls it up on ourselves, but given that there's already customisation of the image going on to make it work with OpenVZ it'd be nice if this extra little step were taken. (Cut down on inane questions like mine too!)

  7. #17
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    Oh, and I guess from reading what others have written above it would be wise to add:
    glibc, gcc, and perhaps elfutils?

    I'm starting to think that there's no way of keeping something like FC6 reasonably updated within a VPS environment in that case. I've had a bit of a look around the OpenVZ.org website, but I can't find a definitive list of ThingsWhichYouShouldntChange. Can someone point me in the direction of something like that?

    Also, if/when updates come out for e.g. FC6 is it the policy of VPSLink to track the fedoraproject and make the changes available in some timeframe? It seems like one of the normal responsibilities of a systems administrator is to apply any updates/changes made available from upstream (either a distributor, or directly from the project), but that running a VPS server means there's a whole bunch of stuff that can't be touched.

    Now, I'm (maybe) happy enough with not touching some things as long as I know what they are, but I have to say that not being able to update e.g. GCC seems a bit odd, but previous posters seem to know more about it than me.

  8. #18
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    Yes, this matter of keeping systems upgraded isn't a small one. After all, many of those patches are for *security*. I learned the hard way today how easily a system can be fubar'ed -- esp since we can't backup/restore our image directly just yet, nor do we have any means of console-type access.

    I agree that having a configuration for yum (perhaps relevant to each version) that prevents updating problem packages would be ideal. This way, we could at least upgrade those things we can and then have some idea of what items we would need to be putting pressure onto VPSLINK to upgrade on the server side should important security issues develop. One way or another, patching is something that being virtual should not prevent.... or it will result in security issues before too long.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by taroliw
    Yes, this matter of keeping systems upgraded isn't a small one. After all, many of those patches are for *security*. I learned the hard way today how easily a system can be fubar'ed -- esp since we can't backup/restore our image directly just yet, nor do we have any means of console-type access.
    This is true. Many OS patches are for security. I would like some clarification regarding using Debian Stable and running apt-get. On another VPS (granted, it's Virtuozzo-based so the guest VPSs's can't change the kernel used in the OS image) I regularly run
    Code:
    apt-get update
    followed by
    Code:
    apt-get upgrade
    To fail to do so would mean not getting updated package versions from security.debian.org ... not a good idea on a publically-accessible server. There's also the point newer versions fix bugs, making the system work / work better.

  10. #20
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    May 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pierre_@_VPSLink
    I figured I'd create a sticky as we have had several clients doing it recently:

    DO NOT UPGRADE YOUR OS FROM INSIDE YOUR VPS. (using yum, apt-get, etc..)

    This will break some important functionalities inside your vps like networking or ssh, and we will not be able to fix it.

    The only method to change your OS is to use one of the provided templates available through cp.vpslink.com.
    hummm... I updated my Link 4 (Fedora Core 5) with <yum update> this morning at 4:00AM, various packages have been added and other have been deleted and I am running just fine at this time without only one problem... But now I will suspend this <yum update> I'm running Server CP Lite, Webmin and a lot of apps like emacs and more...Apparently Link 4 rocks as I never saw another VPS under VZPP rocking!!

    Regards...
    The-REV
    ////////////////////////////////////////////
    @Macarlo Networks, Inc.
    Trusted Since 1997
    http://macarloshark.com/
    News at http://macarlo.com/default.htm

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