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Thread: What is the Best OS to go for here?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    13

    Default What is the Best OS to go for here?

    Based on the low memory overhead, ease of setup, error free operation, etc - what would be the best OS to go for?

    I initially went for the latest Ubuntu, but I couldn't get just the mailserver up on link-1 - so changed to ubuntu 6. I've gone to link-4 now, and ubunto 6 seems to use an older ver of phpmyadmin for some reason (apt-get installs 2.8) and can't import my database, so wonder if I should use 7 or another flavor?

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    276

    Default

    If you're not satisfied with the Ubuntu options, I would recommend using CentOS 5 on a Link 1.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Default

    I installed CentOS 5 with LAMP (on link-4) - seemed to go well, got apache/mysql/postfix, etc working, even got pommo to work - except I couldn't get ISPconfig to work, it just fell over when close to completion.

    I loaded a joomla site - but now there are a number of problems. The joomla administrator pages are screwed - wrong menu/layout, can't use it. In the front end, it has problems with much of the code, and now for some reason it re-directs the site to my original site hosting! It was fine with ubuntu

    I think i'll try something else - maybe ubuntu again?

  4. #4

    Default

    Jamesk: You can also give Debian a go -- I've found it tends to hold your hand a little less. In regards to phpmyadmin -- if the distro package isn't up-to-date, you should just install it "from source" (since it is just a bunch of PHP pages). That way you'll also know you're mostly good to go security wise.
    Kelvin Nicholson
    http://www.helomx.com - Blacklist and availability monitoring built from the ground up for outsourced IT providers.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    314

    Default

    Lxadmin HIB is a very nice little package and uses very little resources as well.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    I've used Redhat, Fedora, Ubuntu, and many others, but I always seem to revert back to Debian.

    Debian has a long history of stability and security, but as kelvinn mentioned, Debian does not hold your hand compared to other distros.

  7. #7

    Wink

    It really doesn't matter what you run so much as how familiar you are with it. VPSlinks are in a virtualized environment - they're all running the same kernel regardless of what distribution you choose. If you have issues with phpadmin or joomla, you're almost certainly going to have the same issues on another system, cause the software's still the same. At the end of the day you can get your job done on just about anything - the question to ask yourself is, "what am I going to have the least headaches with (i.e. something I already know or have a strong interest in learning), and which will I be able to fix the fastest when/if something does go terribly wrong?" If you really don't have a high level of confidence in any one in particular, then it probably makes sense to pick one based on popularity and amount of free support and documentation you can find. You can always change your mind later.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    UK, England
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    272

    Default

    I started a few years back on CentOS and after using many others, allways end up back at CentOS. It is fairly easy to learn and uses (what I would call) "Standards".

    Its fairly easy to learn it. Download a SSH cheat sheet and stick it on your wall, it will work wonders for you!

    Speed wise, its not got any special whizzy speeds. Its what you would expect an OS to be - fast and responsive.

    I've used it on Link 4 with 50+ sites with now slowdowns and without using over 65% server resources.

    I now have it on link 3 and am planning on putting a bunch of forums on there - It can handle it without problems.

  9. #9

    Default

    One thing I have noticed in the default images for both Etch(Debian) and Gutsy(Ubuntu), is that there are several un-necessary things that you can eliminate to save resources. Most memorable is that my Gutsy image had DHCP client(s?) running. Kinda silly on a server with a static IP, eh? You can also save some space by removing the non-server related packages, like acpi and laptop support that I recall both of these having.

    Regarding phpmyadmin, since it is just a scripting package(and these seem to have often, and severe security updates), I always install this type of thing from the original providers website. It fits into a single directory within your webroot. There really is no benefit to a "from package management" installation of this type of software.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,141

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rxKaffee View Post
    One thing I have noticed in the default images for both Etch(Debian) and Gutsy(Ubuntu), is that there are several un-necessary things that you can eliminate to save resources. Most memorable is that my Gutsy image had DHCP client(s?) running. Kinda silly on a server with a static IP, eh? You can also save some space by removing the non-server related packages, like acpi and laptop support that I recall both of these having.
    Thank you for the report - I have requested that our development team follow up on these unnecessary components.

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